A Sight for Sore Eyes

Carmen elizabeth juanita echo skye bravo cortez

A researcher tells the following story about her own experience of discovering the seriousness with which young children take gender stereotypes. While interviewing 3 to 6 year olds about their career aspirations, she asked each of them what they would want to be when they grew up if they were members of the opposite sex. Their responses showed that not only did most of the children choose careers that fit the stereotypes of the other gender but also that their perceptions of the limitations imposed by gender were sometimes quite extreme. One little girl confided with a sigh that her true ambition was to fly like a bird, but she could never do it because she was not a boy! One little boy put his hands on his head, sighed deeply, and said helplessly that if he were a girl he would have to grow up and be nothing (Beuf, 1974 as cited by Lips, 2008, p. 401).

holy fucking shit i just

that last line

(via ireandmaliss)

(via imgross-ok)

coffeeandcockatiels:

maddddddds:

korra:

awkward how reassuring i find this

well ya duh society shames speech patterns associated with young women

"Speech fillers" are just a human’s way of saying "wait a sec I’m thinking". It means we think more before we speak, always trying to find the right way to say it. Every language has them. And people shouldn’t be annoyed by it, ever.

coffeeandcockatiels:

maddddddds:

korra:

awkward how reassuring i find this

well ya duh society shames speech patterns associated with young women


"Speech fillers" are just a human’s way of saying "wait a sec I’m thinking". It means we think more before we speak, always trying to find the right way to say it. Every language has them. And people shouldn’t be annoyed by it, ever.

(via imgross-ok)